Employment Law

Discrimination in the Workplace and How to Handle It

Discrimination in the Workplace and How to Handle It

Discrimination in the workplace has become a common topic over the past few years.HR professionals are probably already aware of all the types of discrimination that can occur in the workplace, including age, disability, harassment, national origin, pregnancy, religion, disability, sex, and more. It is important to know how to deal with this if there is ever discrimination happening in your company. Being knowledgeable about the laws that protect your employees and knowing what is going on in your company are ideal places to start when dealing with discrimination. Here are some tips HR managers should follow when dealing with discrimination in the workplace:

Job Classifications: Do I Have an Employee or a Contractor?

Job Classifications: Do I Have an Employee or a Contractor?

Before you can properly run payroll for your new hire you need a few key pieces of information; pay rate, pay frequency, cost center assignment, personnel information, and preferred method of payment are all obvious components of running payroll, but what about the classification of your relationship with the person performing work? Knowing whether or not you have an employee or a contractor is vital when paying the individual for their hours worked. If you have an employee that you have mistaken for an independent contractor you will need to audit your information and withhold the appropriate taxes from their wages. Not sure what the difference between a direct hire and a contractor is? Keep reading to learn the telltale signs.

Paying Employees on Jury Duty Leave

Paying Employees on Jury Duty Leave

Jury duty is never fun, not for the person who has been summoned as a juror, and especially not for their employer who has to go on with one less employee. As an employer it can be extremely frustrating to have your staff pulled away for jury duty, but there isn’t much you can do about it other than disperse work to others in order to make up for that absence of the juror. The U.S. has a few provisions set in place to protect workers who do get called for jury duty in order to make sure their employment is not at jeopardy. 

A Brief Overview of the Michigan Worker’s Disability Compensation Act

A Brief Overview of the Michigan Worker’s Disability Compensation Act

In 1912, the state of Michigan adopted The Worker’s Disability Compensation Act. Worker’s Compensation is designed to provide wage replacement, medical, and rehabilitation benefits to those who are injured while at the workplace. In order to qualify for worker’s compensation, the injury must arise out of and in the course of employment. This can be a bit confusing and is different case by case depending on if the worker is on the job, or traveling to or from the job site. Typically injuries that occur on the way to or from work are not covered under worker’s compensation. 

Staying Compliant with HR and Employment Law

Staying Compliant with HR and Employment Law

Even with a fully staffed Human Resources Department it can be hard to keep up on employment law and regulations, especially with the new standards set by the Affordable Care Act. Topics such as FMLA, discrimination, and ADA, can be foggy for employers, but it is crucial that guidelines are followed in order to remain compliant and avoid potential issues with the law. 

Many employers don’t have the time to dive into what regulations they are covered under. Typically, this is based on the number of employees you company has. As an example, in order to qualify for FMLA as a private employer you must employ 50 or more people for at least 20 workweeks during the current or preceding calendar year.*