discrimination

The Rise of Racial Profiling and Discrimination in the Workplace and What You Can Do About It

The Rise of Racial Profiling and Discrimination in the Workplace and What You Can Do About It

By now you have probably already seen the viral video that is going around involving the arrest of two African-American men at a Philadelphia store. These two men entered a Starbucks and asked to use the bathroom, but an employee informed them that it was only for paying customers. When the men sat down in the store without ordering anything, the manager decided to call the police. When the police arrived at the establishment, the two men were arrested for trespassing as the friend that they were waiting for arrived at the store. This viral video has triggered many different reactions. Members of Black Lives Matter PA held a rally outside of Starbucks and some protesters even went inside the store to confront the manager. Celebrities and politicians have also been calling for action, including Kevin Hart and Jim Kenney, who are both Philadelphia natives. After apologizing for the incident, Starbucks’ CEO, Kevin Johnson, announced that all stores will be closed on May 29, 2018, for racial-bias education.

Discrimination in the Workplace and How to Handle It

Discrimination in the Workplace and How to Handle It

Discrimination in the workplace has become a common topic over the past few years.HR professionals are probably already aware of all the types of discrimination that can occur in the workplace, including age, disability, harassment, national origin, pregnancy, religion, disability, sex, and more. It is important to know how to deal with this if there is ever discrimination happening in your company. Being knowledgeable about the laws that protect your employees and knowing what is going on in your company are ideal places to start when dealing with discrimination. Here are some tips HR managers should follow when dealing with discrimination in the workplace:

Age Discrimination in the Workplace

Age Discrimination in the Workplace

Over the past few decades, age discrimination in the workplace has received a lot of attention. Age discrimination means treating an applicant or an employee in a less favorable way because of their age. Some interesting statistics are that in 2013 more than 21,000 complaints for age discrimination were filed, and that 64% of workers say that they have either seen or experienced some form of age discrimination in the workplace. To most employers it may seem logical to hire a younger employee over an older one with the idea that the younger employee is more likely to stay with the company longer. There is a problem with this, since basing a hiring decision on age is illegal in the United States. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) only protects people who are 40 years of age or older, but some states do have laws that protect younger workers from being discriminated for their age. The law forbids discrimination when it comes to any aspect of employment; this includes hiring, paying, firing, promoting, training, laying off, providing benefits, etc.