Payroll

Optimizing Payroll for the Manufacturing Industry

Optimizing Payroll for the Manufacturing Industry

Some sort of payroll process is necessary for nearly any business, regardless of its industry. However, there are some industries that need more than just basic payroll software in order to better run their day-to-day processes. Chief among these is the manufacturing industry. Whether it’s assembly work, machine operation, packaging, shipping, or supervising, organizations in this industry need to have a payroll software that can handle the intricacies of running a manufacturing business.

The 3 Most Common Payroll Mistakes

The 3 Most Common Payroll Mistakes

As a payroll software company, we at Dominion know all too well that processing payroll has a lot of factors that processors have to consider. There are a lot of unnecessary expenses that can really add up if you don’t monitor them closely. Using a payroll software-as-a-service is the best way to avoid these mistakes, but obviously not every company is able to do that. If you’re still manually processing payroll, check out the three most common mistakes that even seasoned payroll professionals make.

The Four Primary Benefits Of Payroll Software

The Four Primary Benefits Of Payroll Software

There are a number of ways to process payroll, each with their own perks and drawbacks. You can process in-house, use a CPA firm, or use a Software as a Service (SaaS). Using a SaaS has a ton of benefits, from reducing manual tasks to keeping track of all employee data in a centralized location. Payroll software is specifically designed to help make your job easier, so consider these options on how it can benefit you and your company.

4 Common Questions about Employer Payroll Taxes

4 Common Questions about Employer Payroll Taxes

If you run payroll, you’re responsible for paying employer payroll tax annually. And while all tax forms need to be filed as accurately as possible, employer payroll tax forms should be completed with the utmost level of accuracy. In order to properly check all the right boxes, let’s answer some common employer payroll tax questions.

Where to Begin When Looking for a Payroll Service Provider

Where to Begin When Looking for a Payroll Service Provider

Doing your own payroll, even if it’s for just one employee, usually comes with a lot of work and headaches. This is why payroll service providers have come up with ways to help make the life of payroll managers much easier. Because there are a lot of rules, laws, calculations, and other things to know, using online payroll processing services to run payroll makes more sense, since they do most of the work for you. But how do you know which payroll service is the best option for your company?

Common Payroll Reports to Use for Your Business

Common Payroll Reports to Use for Your Business

HR professionals, accountants, and payroll employees are often looking to simplify the complicated process of running payroll. Businesses and organizations of all sizes can benefit from monitoring payroll analytics, tax reports, and deduction information to effectively balance the books. But what’s the best way to easily track and identify payroll metrics? The answer: payroll reports.

Keeping the Company Safe: Human Resource’s Role in Cybersecurity

Keeping the Company Safe: Human Resource’s Role in Cybersecurity

With modern employees working remotely and on multiple devices nowadays, the need for increased cybersecurity is more prevalent than ever. Unprotected computers are easy targets for cybercrime, and make companies vulnerable to security breaches and hacks by cybercriminals. The risk of a security breach could be detrimental to the prosperity of a business and the digital health of its employees.

Exempt vs. Non-Exempt Employees: Understanding the Difference

Exempt vs. Non-Exempt Employees: Understanding the Difference

There are two classifications of employees: exempt and non-exempt. An exempt employee is not entitled to overtime pay by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), even if it takes 55 hours to finish their weekly workload. Exempt employees must earn a minimum of $455 per week. Non-exempt employees are protected by FLSA regulations and are paid overtime. Regardless if they’re paid hourly or a salary, they must be paid at least the federal minimum wage.